Redshift All-Sky Camera

Real-Time, High Resolution Images of the Night Sky (150°)

Images are updated periodically (60-90 seconds) throughout the night starting at Civil Twilight (as opposed to Nautical Twilight and Astronomical Twilight).  Current civil twilight time as well as current moon data can be seen about mid-way down the page under Almanac on my Redshift Weather Station NOTE: the camera images are NOT updated during daylight hours.  The Starlight Xpress Oculus is a high resolution, very compact wide-field camera, utilizing a sensitive Sony SuperHAD CCD chip with an array of 1392 x 1040 pixels.  Due to its low light sensitivity, images are over-exposed in daylight or during times of bright moonlight.  Exposures range from 0.05 seconds (bright moon and daylight) to 30 seconds when the sky is at its darkest.  On a normal, mostly moonless night, the camera can take over 2000 images. 

Right below the image is information pertaining to the displayed image.  Time is Mountain Time USA, 24-hour clock.  Exposure is expressed in seconds.  Image Background indicates the level of brightness in a 16-bit system from 0 to 65,535.  North is up and West is to the right.

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ALL-SKY TIMELAPSE – LAST HOUR ANIMATION LOOP

 

ALL-SKY TIMELAPSE – PREVIOUS NIGHT ANIMATION LOOP SUNSET to SUNRISE

BONUS VIDEO CLIP

Overnight time-lapsed all-sky camera video taken at Redshift Observatory in New Mexico.  Just before 11:00 PM MST, it caught a bright fireball (exploding meteor?) that was probably fairly low in the atmosphere (based on star field comparisons with other local all-sky captures at the same time).  This is a one-minute video of 2014 images taken over 13 hours on Jan 29-20, 2017 – average exposure per frame about 20 seconds.  The bright object in the early evening on the right (west) is Venus.  North is up.  Throughout the 1-minute clip, you can see a fair number of satellites and a few meteors.  In case you missed the fireball flash, there is a one-frame image at the end.